Dec 182018
 

The 2018 Australasian Masters is up an running in Melbourne Australia, with another batch of local players hoping to pick up IM/GM results. The GM event sees Andrey Kvon and Vasily Papin back up from the Australian Young Masters, where they have been joined by Australia’s top player GM Anton Smirnov. Smirnov leads the event with three wins from his first three games, although has yet to play Kvon and Papin. Of the norm chasers, IM Bobby Cheng is well placed on 2.5/3, while veteran IM Stephen Solomon has started with 2 wins and a loss (to Smirnov).
In the IM event, New Zealand junior Alphaeus Ang leads with 3/3. Close behind is FM Brandon Clarke, who is hoping to pick up his second IM norm, after narrowly missing out in Adelaide.
Coverage of the event is a little hard to find, but a good starting point is https://chessnews.asia/2018-australasian-masters/ The Pairing And Results links also has replayable games, but there seems to be no links to live games.

Ang,Alphaeus Wei Ern (2118) – Lee,Qing Aun (2297)
2018 Australasian Masters IM Norm Tourna Melbourne AUS (3), 17.12.2018 new PgnViewer( { boardName: “game921”, movesFormat: “default”, pgnString:’1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 c5 3.d5 b5 4.Qc2 bxc4 5.e4 e6 6.Nc3 exd5 7.e5 d4 8.exf6 d5 9.Bxc4 dxc4 10.Qe4+ Be6 11.Qxa8 dxc3 12.Ne2 Bd5 13.Qxa7 Nc6 14.Qa4 Bxg2 15.Rg1 Bf3 16.fxg7 Bxg7 17.Rxg7 Qf6 18.Qa8+ Kd7 19.Qb7+ Ke6 20.Nf4+ Ke5 21.Qc7+ Ke4 22.Rxf7 Rg8 23.Ne2 Kd3 24.Rxf6 Bxe2 25.Qxh7+ 1-0′, pauseBetweenMoves: 500, pieceSize: 29 } );

2018 Australasian Masters
Source: Chessexpress

Dec 182018
 

The RA Winter Open ran December 7-9, 2018. For the first time in living memory, GM Bator Sambuev did not win the weekend tournament in Ottawa! The three-time and current Canadian Champion was held to draws by juniors Olivier-Kenta Chiku-Ratte in round 3 and Svitlana Demchenko in round 5 to finish with 4/5. Kenta defeated Shawn Rodrigue-Lemieux in round 5 to finish with 4.5/5 and clear first place, worth $350… and Big Bragging Rights. GM Sambuev was second and Demchenko was third. 

Other Winners:

  • U1900 – Dan Kearnan (4/5) 
  • U1600 – Michael Shi (4/5)

 

photos on the CFC Newsletter facebook page:


Our Canadian Game of the Week is the final round board 1 game between Canada’s new #1 CFC-rated woman, Svitlana Demchenko, and the current Canadian Champion GM Bator Sambuev. Going into the round, Sambuev was tied for 1st with Olivier-Kenta Chiku-Ratte, and knew he needed to beat his 15-year-old opponent to win the tournament. He played a Dragadorf Sicilian, and the game was very interesting…

..

() – ()
 
 Round:  Result:
[Event "RA December Open"]
[Site "Ottawa "]
[Date "2018.12.09"]
[Round "5"]
[White "Demchenko, Svitlana"]
[Black "Sambuev, Bator"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "B75"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "111"]
[EventDate "2018.??.??"]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 g6 6. Be3 Bg7 7. f3 a6 {
[#]The "Dragadorf", a hybrid Dragon-on-the-kingside and
Najdorf-on-the-queenside. It started to become very popular in the late 1990s,
but was played in 1957 by Reshevsky (with ...b5 and ...h5) and three times by
Botvinnink in the early 1960s.} 8. Qd2 {The most popular move.} ({Here's a
classic game in the Dragadorf that started with White's second most popular
move:} 8. Bc4 b5 9. Bb3 Bb7 10. Qd2 Nbd7 11. O-O-O (11. Bh6 $5 Bxh6 12. Qxh6
Nc5 13. O-O-O Nxb3+ 14. cxb3 $1 $14) 11... Nc5 12. Kb1 Nxb3 13. cxb3 $5 {
Top players invariably capture this way, but maybe it's not clear just why. 
About a similar position against Larsen, Fischer wrote, "Black cannot make any
attacking headway against this particular Pawn configuration. White is lost in
the King and Pawn ending, it's true, but Black usually gets mated long before
then. As Tarrasch put it: "Before the endgame the gods have placed the middle
game."" - Fischer, M60MG, g.2. I thought Fischer's idea is that this
recapture makes it nearly impossible for Black to attack on the a and b-files,
but in his recent book about Botvinnik, Lakdawala writes that the open c-file
helps White defend against an attack on his King by exchanges. But if Fischer
is right, wouldn't those trades just lead to a losing endgame? I'm sure
Fischer was the better player, but Lakdawala was writing with 50+ years of
practice since Fischer wrote M60MG.} O-O 14. Bh6 (14. b4 a5 $1 $132) 14... Bxh6
15. Qxh6 {[#]} b4 $1 16. e5 $6 (16. Nd5 $142 $1 Bxd5 17. exd5 Qd7 {guarding f5.
} (17... Nxd5 18. Nf5 $1 {with an attack.}) 18. h4 (18. g4 Nxd5 19. Nf5 gxf5
20. gxf5) 18... Nxd5 19. h5 Nf6 20. g4 {gives White an attack for the pawn,
but Black may be able to hang on to the extra material. An interesting battle
lies ahead. - Simon Williams "The New Sicilian Dragon".}) 16... Nd7 $1 (16...
bxc3 $2 17. exf6 exf6 18. bxc3 $16) (16... dxe5 $2 17. Nf5 gxf5 18. Rxd8 $16)
17. h4 $2 (17. exd6 e5 $1 $19) (17. Ne4 Bxe4+ {only move.} 18. fxe4 Nxe5 $17) 17... bxc3
18. h5 dxe5 $1 (18... c2+ 19. Nxc2 g5 20. Qxg5+ Kh8 21. exd6 $44) 19. hxg6 Nf6
20. bxc3 (20. Nf5 c2+ {only move.} 21. Kxc2 Qc8+ {only move.} $19) 20... exd4 21. gxh7+ Kh8 22.
Rxd4 Qa5 $19 {0-1 (28) Littlewood,J-Botvinnik,M Hastings 1961}) 8... b5 {
Most annotators say Black should wait for 000 before playing ...b5, as
otherwise White can castle short and get queenside play with a4.} 9. O-O-O (9.
a4 b4 10. Nd5 (10. Na2 $5 a5 11. c3 (11. Bb5+ $5)) 10... Nxd5 11. exd5 Bb7 12.
Bc4 Nd7 13. a5 Nf6 $6 (13... Qc7 $14) 14. Ne2 (14. Qxb4 Bxd5 15. Bxa6 $16)
14... O-O 15. Ra4 Rc8 16. b3 (16. Bb6 $1) 16... Rc5 17. Rxb4 Rxd5 $6 18. Bxd5
Bxd5 19. Rb6 Qc8 20. O-O Bb7 21. c4 Nd7 22. Rc1 (22. Rb4 $1 $16) 22... Nxb6 23.
axb6 h5 {Kramnik,V (2808)-Nakamura,H (2785) Stavanger blitz 2017 ½-½ (61)})
9... Bb7 (9... h5 $5 {discouraging g2-g4, but falling provocatively far behind
in development.} 10. Nd5 Bb7 11. Nxf6+ Bxf6 12. Bg5 (12. Kb1 Nd7 13. c4 $13 {
1-0 (36) Najer,E (2669)-Shabalov,A (2569) Philadelphia 2009}) 12... Bxg5 13.
Qxg5 e5 14. Qxd8+ Kxd8 15. Nb3 Ke7 16. Na5 Ra7 {1/2-1/2 (49) Balogh,C (2660)
-Belezky,A (2451) Germany 2014}) 10. g4 h5 11. g5 Nfd7 12. Kb1 O-O 13. Bd3 $6 {
White should leave the Bf1 where it is until it's clear where it belongs --
BxNc4, Bh3, and Bd3 are all still options.} (13. f4 $5 $13 {or Rg1 preparing
f4-f5 are both better.} e5) (13. Bg2 Nb6 14. a3 $2 Nc4 15. Qd3 Nxe3 16. Qxe3
Nd7 (16... b4 $1 17. axb4 Nc6 $1 18. Nxc6 Bxc6 19. Nd5 Rb8 $19) 17. f4 e5 $1
18. Nf3 exf4 19. Qxf4 Ne5 $17 {0-1 (48) Griffiths,R (2104)-Jones,G (2509)
Bunratty 2007}) 13... Nc5 14. Rhe1 Nbd7 15. f4 b4 16. Nd5 e6 $17 17. Nf6+ {
[#] A critical position White would get a better attack if her Re1 was on g1,
but she still gets a dangerous attack here.} Bxf6 $2 (17... Kh8 $2 18. Nxh5 $1
gxh5 19. Qe2 {and White has Qxh5, Rg1 and g6.}) (17... Nxf6 {only move.} 18. gxf6 Qxf6 (
18... Bxf6 19. f5 {with an attack for the pawn.}) 19. f5 Qe5 (19... exf5 20.
exf5 Nxd3 21. Qxd3 Rae8 $17 {Lc)}) 20. fxg6 fxg6 $19) 18. gxf6 Bxe4 $2 (18...
Nxf6 $1 19. f5 $1 Nfxe4 (19... e5 20. Nb3 Ncxe4 21. Qxb4 $16) 20. Qxb4 exf5 21.
Nxf5 {only move.} Rb8 (21... gxf5 22. Bxe4 $1 Bxe4 (22... Nxe4 23. Qxb7 $18) 23. Bxc5
dxc5 24. Qc3 $18) 22. Qa3 $13) 19. Bxe4 (19. Nxe6 $1 fxe6 20. Bxc5 Nxc5 21.
Bxe4 Nxe4 22. Rxe4 $16 {Lc0}) 19... Nxe4 20. Qg2 $1 {[#]} Nexf6 $6 (20... Ndc5
21. Nxe6 Nxe6 22. Qxe4 Qxf6 23. Rxd6 $16) (20... Ndxf6 $2 21. Nxe6 fxe6 22.
Qxg6+ {is worse than the game, since the Ne4 will be hanging.}) 21. Nxe6 $1 $18
fxe6 22. Qxg6+ Kh8 23. Bd4 $5 (23. Qh6+ $1 Nh7 24. Bd4+ Rf6 (24... Ndf6 25.
Rxe6 $18) (24... e5 25. fxe5 dxe5 26. Bxe5+ $18) 25. Rxe6 $18) (23. Rxd6 $1 Qe8
(23... Qe7 24. Bd4 $18) 24. Qh6+ Nh7 25. Rxe6 $18) 23... e5 (23... Qe7 24. Rxe6
{only move.} $18 Qg7 (24... Qxe6 25. Qxh5+ $18 {and Rg1}) 25. Qg5 Rf7 26. Rxd6 $18) 24.
fxe5 dxe5 25. Bxe5 Nxe5 $1 26. Qh6+ Nh7 27. Rxd8 Raxd8 {[#]} 28. Qxh5 {Wins a
pawn, but leaves the R defending the back rank. Instead, moving the a-pawn
activates the R -- threatening RxN and Re7 -- and still leaves the h-pawn
hanging.} (28. a3 $1 Ng4 29. Qxh5 Ngf6 30. Qa5 bxa3 31. Qxa3 $18) (28. a4 $1
Rf6 (28... bxa3 $2 29. Rxe5 $18) 29. Qxh5 Nc6 30. Rg1 $18 {Black will have to
trade a R to get his K and Nh7 into the game, and the R exchange will probably
make it impossible to hold the queenside pawns.}) 28... Nf3 $1 {This wouldn't
be possible if the a-pawn had moved, since Re7 would win immediately.} 29. Rc1
Rf6 30. b3 Rd4 31. Qe8+ $2 (31. c4 $142 $1 bxc3 32. Rxc3 Rdf4 33. a4 {White is
clearly still playing for the win. Computers rate this as +2, but it's not as
easy at that makes it seem: Black has more pieces and none of them are
vulnerable to capture, though the exposed K will always allow White some free
tempi. My hunch is that advancing White's queenside pawns will eventually cost
Black a piece, though that might still not be enough to win.}) 31... Kg7 32.
Qe7+ Rf7 {[#]} 33. Qe6 $2 ({White misses her last real chance.} 33. Rg1+ $3 {
forces a R trade. That means neither side will get any serious threats against
the opponent's K, and that Black will have a harder time defending his
queenside pawns.} Nxg1 (33... Nhg5 $4 34. Rxg5+ Nxg5 35. Qe5+ $18) 34. Qe5+ Rf6
35. Qxd4 Nf3 36. Qg4+ Kf7 (36... Kh6 37. Qxb4 $18) 37. h4 $18 a5 38. Qh5+ $18)
33... Rf6 34. Qe7+ Kg6 35. Kb2 Nhg5 36. Qe8+ Kg7 37. Qe7+ Rf7 38. Qc5 Ne4 {[#]}
39. Qb6 (39. Rg1+ {only move.} $18 Kh6 (39... Neg5 40. Rxg5+ $18) 40. Qc8 $1 Neg5 $1 (
40... Nxg1 $2 41. Qh8+ $18) (40... Nc3 $4 41. Qe6+) 41. Qxa6+ Kh5 42. Rg2 {
compared to the game, White has won a pawn and put the black K in a worse spot.
}) 39... Rf6 40. Qb7+ Kg6 41. Rf1 Neg5 42. Rf2 Re4 43. Rg2 Rfe6 44. Qa8 Kf5 45.
Qf8+ Rf6 46. Qc8+ Rfe6 47. Qf8+ Ke5 48. Qc5+ Kf6 49. Qf8+ Nf7 50. Rf2 Rf4 51.
Qa8 N7e5 52. Qf8+ Nf7 53. Qa8 N7e5 54. Qf8+ (54. a3 $5 bxa3+ 55. Kxa3 {and
White is still playing for a win (but don't ask me how).}) 54... Nf7 55. Qa8
N7e5 56. Qf8+ 1/2-1/2
merida
46

..

 

GOTW: Demchenko – Sambuev, Ottawa 2018
Source: Canadian Chess