Oct 172018
 

 
 

Wednesday, October 24, 2018
On Wednesday, October 24 the Boylston Chess Foundation will hold our Annual Membership Meeting.
 

On this important night, we will conduct our annual election of Officers and Board Members. The meeting will start at 7:00 PM, and the election will be held shortly thereafter.
 

Please come to this important event, and help determine the future of our non-profit organization.
 

The meeting will be held at 40 Norris Street in Cambridge, in Suite B103. Parking is available on Massachusetts Avenue, or in Davis Square.

To be eligible to vote, you must be a member in good standing at the time of our Annual Meeting, and have been a member for a least one month at any time prior to the date of the meeting. Our membership vote is non-binding, and must be ratified by the current Board of Directors.

 

We hope that every member who is able to, attends our annual meeting on October 24. Together, we can continue to strengthen our foundation and give it a bright future!










Boylston Chess Foundation Annual Membership Meeting
Source: Boylston Chess Club Weblog

Oct 172018
 

Apparently this is a real thing https://www.chess.com/news/view/world-chess-launches-chess-dating-app
As the above story states (slightly NSFW btw), it is a hookup app designed to bring chess players together (a kind of online Bermuda Party!). There appears to be some connection with the upcoming World Championship match, which makes the logo used for the match less of a surprise (according to Anish Giri)

No more lonely knights
Source: Chessexpress

Oct 172018
 

The diagrams are both Black to Play; from the games Gordon – Pace and Ramesh – Balasooniya, both played at the 2018 Almonte Open.
Full analysis of both in the game player below.


The 2018 Almonte Open took place October 13 – 14 at the Mill of Kintail Museum and Gatehouse in Almonte, Ontario.

33 players competed. Zach Dukic and David Gordon were =1st with 4.5/5, but they didn’t play each other due to earlier draws and a four-way tie for the lead going into the final round.  Christopher Pace, William Doubleday, Dusan Simic, Daniel Xu, and Houji Yao tied for 3rd-7th with 3.5/5.

Alexandre Khan was top U1900 and Herb Langer topped the U1600s.

Note: the first day was played in the Mill of Kintail Museum, an 1830s stone-grinding river mill which has been turned into a Museum, including an exhibition showing off Almonte’s most famous son: the inventor of basketball, James Naismith. You can see pix from both days at the link below.

Links


Games

Our Canadian Game(s) of the Week are two crazy slug-fests from the Almonte Open. The first one — Gordon – Pace — was with first prize on the line…

..

() – ()
 
 Round:  Result:
[Event "Almonte Open"]
[Site "Chess.com"]
[Date "2018.10.14"]
[Round "5"]
[White "Gordon, David"]
[Black "Pace, Christopher"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B06"]
[WhiteElo "2255"]
[BlackElo "2250"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "89"]
[EventDate "2018.??.??"]
[EventType "rapid"]

1. d4 d6 2. Nc3 g6 3. e4 Bg7 4. f4 a6 {[#] Nakamura and Caruana
have both played this as Black, but only in rapid or blitz games.} 5. a4 {
Stops Black's plan of queenside expansion and allows White the most aggressive
set-up with Bc4, but it's not popular. IM Cyrus Lakdawala's "Move by Move: The
Modern" (Everyman, 2012) says: "I have always thought that a4 is medically
unsafe for White and doesn't particularly mix well with the Austrian Attack
set-up...: 1. a4 ruins White's queenside castling option. 2. The game may
transpose to Pirc lines with ...Nf6 and ...c5, in which case Black is handed
use of the b4-square."} (5. Nf3 {is the main line} b5 6. Bd3 Nd7 7. a4 b4 8.
Ne2 c5 9. c3 Bb7 $14 {White has expanded in the center and Black on the
queenside, almost certainly both to White's advantage.} 10. O-O Ngf6 11. e5 Nd5
12. Bd2 (12. Ng5 $5 {aiming for e5-e6}) 12... bxc3 13. bxc3 cxd4 14. cxd4 O-O
15. Ng3 a5 $1 (15... Bh6 16. f5) 16. Kh1 $6 Nb4 17. Be4 d5 $1 $15 {0-1 (49)
Anand,V (2759)-Nakamura,H (2769) Leuven rapid, 2018}) 5... b6 {Now it looks
like Black might try to play a Hippo (a6, b6, e6, d6, g6, with Ns on d7 and e7)
, but f2-f4 before Nf3 gives White much quicker breaks in more typical lines
with c2-c4.} (5... Nf6 {transposing to a Pirc sideline with ...a6 and a4 is
Black's best-scoring continuation.}) 6. Nf3 Bb7 {This is probably inaccurate:
Black isn't going to get to pressure e4 with ...b5-b4 anytime soon, and the
Bc8 can be useful defending both f5 and e6 (especially if White plays the sac
with e5-e6 then Ng5)} (6... e6 $5 7. Bc4 Ne7 8. d5 $1 O-O 9. dxe6 fxe6 10. Ng5
$16) 7. Bc4 e6 {[#] White has a choice of a big squeeze and various degrees of
immediate chaos...} 8. f5 $1 {... and maximum chaos it is.} ({White has a
clear plus in a simpler position after the less-ambitious} 8. O-O d5 $1 9. exd5
exd5 10. Bd3) (8. d5 $1 {is also good.} exd5 9. Bxd5 Bxd5 10. Qxd5 Ra7 $2 (
10... Nd7 $142 11. Ng5 Nh6 12. O-O O-O 13. h3 $14) 11. O-O Nf6 (11... Ne7 $142)
12. Qc4 O-O 13. e5 $1 Ne8 14. Be3 c6 15. Qb3 Nd7 16. Rad1 Qe7 17. a5 $18 {
1-0 (44) Iskandarov,M (2486)-Lomsadze,D (2352) Kesan 2018}) {The game is
really complicated now, with many different captures and pawn structure
changes possible, which is the main reason there are so many variations below.
There are also a lot of "?" over the next few moves. That's not because the
players -- both over 2200 CFC -- are weak, but because Stockfish at 30ply can
find its way through complications better than any human who has ever lived.}
8... d5 $2 {Black has a choice of evils, and this is more evil than most.} (
8... exf5 $142 9. O-O (9. exf5 d5 $14) 9... Nf6 10. exf5 O-O (10... d5 11. Re1+
) 11. fxg6 hxg6 12. Bg5 $16 d5 (12... c6 $2 13. Ne4 d5 14. Nxf6+ Bxf6 15. Bxf6
Qxf6 16. Bd3 $18 {with a ready-made attack, a much better B, a safer K, and a
lead in development with at least one more tempo coming of the Qf6.}) 13. Bb3
$16 (13. Bd3 $16)) 9. exd5 (9. fxe6 $1 dxc4 (9... fxe6 10. exd5 exd5 11. Qe2+
Ne7 12. Bb3 (12. Ng5 $16 dxc4 $2 13. Ne6 $18) 12... Qd7 13. Bg5 $18) 10. exf7+
Kxf7 11. O-O $1 {For the B White has one pawn, a big lead in development, and
a strong initiative against the exposed Black K.}) {[#]} 9... exf5 $2 (9...
exd5 10. Bd3 (10. Bb3 Ne7 $16) 10... Nc6 11. O-O Nxd4 12. a5 $1 $16 {a move
the computers like a lot, but I can't figure out why. Maybe Black is in a kind
of zugzwang, where developing the Ng8 allows Bg5 with threats!?}) 10. Ng5 (10.
Bg5 $14) (10. Qe2+ $1 {gives Black a chance to head for a bad endgame; this
may be White's best, but it's probably not why White played 8.f5} Ne7 (10...
Kf8 11. O-O $16) (10... Qe7 11. Bf4 $16) 11. O-O $16 O-O $2 12. Bg5 Re8 13.
Rae1 $18) (10. O-O $1 $16 Ne7 11. Re1 (11. Bg5 Nd7 12. Bxe7 Kxe7 13. g4 $1 {
is the attacker's way to go.}) 11... h6 12. Qe2 $1 Bf6 $6 13. Bf4 (13. Ne5 $1
$18) 13... Kf8 14. Be5 Bxe5 (14... Nc8 $1 $16) 15. Nxe5 (15. dxe5 $18) 15...
Rh7 16. Rad1 Qd6 17. Qe3 Nd7 18. Nxf7 $1 Rxf7 19. Qxh6+ Kg8 20. Re6 $18 {
1/2-1/2 (37) Hasanova,E (2249)-Lanchava,T (2351) Warsaw 2001}) 10... h6 $1 11.
Qe2+ Kf8 $6 (11... Qe7 $1 $13 {is unclear; here is a forcing line:} 12. Qxe7+
Nxe7 13. Nxf7 $5 Kxf7 14. d6+ Ke8 15. dxe7 Bxd4 $13) 12. Nxf7 $5 (12. Nf3 $14)
12... Kxf7 13. Bf4 {[#]} Nd7 $2 (13... Qe8 $2 14. d6+ Kf8 15. Qxe8+ Kxe8 16.
dxc7 Nd7 17. O-O-O $16 {White has two pawns for the N, but one is the monster
on c7, and since he can't castle Black is a LONG way from getting his Rs into
the game.}) (13... Kf8 {Only move} $13 14. O-O-O Bf6 $1 {a nice reorganization which
comes up in a few lines.} 15. g4 $1 (15. Rhe1 Rh7 $1 $13) 15... g5 16. Be5 $1
f4) 14. Qe6+ (14. Bxc7 $1 Qe8 (14... Qxc7 $2 15. d6+ $18) 15. Qe6+ {Only move} $18 Qxe6+
(15... Kf8 16. Bd6+ Ne7 17. O-O-O $18) 16. dxe6+ Ke8 17. exd7+ Kxd7 18. Bxb6
$18) 14... Kf8 15. d6 $2 (15. O-O-O Qe8 (15... Ngf6) 16. Bxc7 Bf6 {Only move} 17. Rhe1
Qf7 18. Qe2 $6 (18. g4 $5) (18. Kb1 $1) 18... Bg5+ 19. Kb1 Ngf6 $15) 15... Qe8
{Only move} $15 16. dxc7 {Only move} Qxe6+ 17. Bxe6 {[#] Black has a better version of the
endgame in the note to move 13.} Ke7 $1 18. Bd5 Bxd5 {Only move} 19. Nxd5+ Ke6 $1 (19...
Kf7 $1) 20. c4 g5 $1 {[#]} 21. a5 $1 {Activating the Ra1 and creating a third
passed pawn.} bxa5 $1 (21... gxf4 $2 22. axb6 $16) (21... b5 22. Nb6 $14) 22.
Rxa5 (22. Bd2 Ngf6 23. Nxf6 Nxf6 24. Rxa5 Rhc8 $19) 22... Ne7 (22... gxf4 $4
23. Rxa6+ $18) (22... Ngf6 $1 23. Nxf6 (23. Be5 Nxe5 24. Nb6 Nxc4 $1 $19) 23...
Bxf6 24. Bd2 Rhc8 $19) 23. Kd2 (23. Nxe7 Kxe7 24. Bd2 Rhc8 25. h4 (25. Rxf5
Rxc7 $19) 25... Rxc7 26. hxg5 hxg5 27. Bxg5+ Kf7 28. Rxf5+ Kg6 29. Rf3 $5 {
sets a cute trap} Kxg5 $4 (29... Rxc4 $142 $1 $19) 30. Rg3+ Kf6 31. O-O+ $1 {
Did you remember White could still castle?}) 23... Nc6 24. Re1+ Kf7 {[#]} 25.
Bd6 $1 {White's best chance, and adding an exchange sac to the chaos.} Nxa5 (
25... Bxd4 $19) 26. Re7+ Kg6 (26... Kg8 27. Rxd7 Nxc4+ 28. Kd3 $1 Nxd6 (28...
Nxb2+ $4 29. Kc3 Na4+ 30. Kb3 $18) 29. Rxd6 $13) 27. Rxd7 Nxc4+ 28. Kc3 Nxd6
29. Rxd6+ {[#]} Kf7 $2 {Keeps centralized, but gives White an additional check
to reorganize, which happens to be more important here.} (29... Kh7 $142 $17
30. Rc6 f4 31. Nb6 Rae8 (31... Rac8 32. Kd3 $11) 32. c8=Q Re3+ 33. Kd2 Rxc8 34.
Nxc8 Bxd4 $17) 30. Kc4 $2 (30. Rd7+ $142 Ke6 31. Nb6 $13) 30... Rhe8 $2 {
Looks right -- R on open file, square to retreat K without disconnecting Rs --
but it leaves f5 undefended and takes away the only safe square from the Ra8.}
(30... Rhf8 $142 31. Nb6 Rae8 {Only move} 32. Rc6 (32. d5 Be5 $17) 32... Re4 $17) (30...
f4 $142 31. Rd7+ Kg6 32. Ne7+ Kh5 33. Kd3 (33. Kd5 $2 Bf6 $19) 33... Rhf8 (
33... Bf6 34. Nd5 $13) 34. c8=R Raxc8 35. Nxc8 Bxd4 36. Rxd4 Rxc8 $17) 31. Rd7+
$11 (31. Nb6 $11) 31... Kf8 32. Nb6 Ra7 33. Kd5 Rxc7 34. Rxc7 Re2 35. b4 Rb2
36. Nd7+ Kg8 37. Rb7 {[#]} a5 $2 {After so many complications Black must have
been in big time trouble here.} (37... Rxg2 $142 38. Ke6 Re2+ 39. Kxf5 Bxd4 40.
Kg6 Re6+ 41. Kf5 $11) 38. Rb8+ $1 {Safties the R and unpins the b-pawn.} (38.
b5 {may be objectively stronger, but the move played keeps a clear advantage
while ensuring that (at worst) it's a two-result game, which would be very
hard to say after 38...f4.}) 38... Kf7 39. bxa5 Ra2 {Only move} (39... Rxg2 $4 40. a6
Ra2 41. Rb7 {Only move} $18 {the discovered check indirectly defends the a6-pawn.}) 40.
Ra8 {[#]} Bxd4 $4 {wins a pawn, but the R ending is lost.} ({Black can keep
the balance with ...f4 or with} 40... Rxg2 $1 41. a6 f4 42. Ne5+ (42. a7 Ra2 {Only move}
$11 43. Nb6 $4 f3 $19) 42... Bxe5 {Only move} 43. dxe5 (43. Kxe5 f3 44. a7) 43... f3 {Only move}
44. e6+ ({The "fork trick" doesn't work when Black has such a far advanced
passer:} 44. a7 $2 Ra2 $17 45. Rh8 f2 $19) 44... Ke7 {Only move} $11 45. Ra7+ Ke8 46.
Ke5 $5 (46. Rf7 $11) 46... Rd2 {to block on the backrank.} (46... f2 $4 47. Kd6
{#3}) (46... Rg4 $11 {so the R can check along the 4th while pushing the
f-pawn.}) 47. Ra8+ (47. Rf7 $11) (47. Kf6 $4 f2 $19 {The Rd2 stops mate and
the f-pawn promotes with check -- Black wins by one tempo.}) 47... Ke7 48. Ra7+
$11) 41. Kxd4 Rd2+ 42. Ke5 Rxd7 43. a6 (43. Kxf5 {also wins, but there's no
need to keep the star of the show waiting on a5.}) 43... Kg7 44. a7 f4 45. Rg8+
1-0

[Event "Almonte Open"]
[Site "Chess.com"]
[Date "2018.10.13"]
[Round "3"]
[White "Ramesh, Sanjay"]
[Black "Balasooniya, Randika"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "E32"]
[WhiteElo "1547"]
[BlackElo "1783"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "62"]
[EventDate "2018.??.??"]
[EventType "rapid"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Qc2 O-O 5. Nf3 d5 6. Bg5 c6 $6
{Black may have been hoping for a sort of Cambridge Springs, but with all his
pawns on light squares he almost certainly does not want to give up his DSB
with ...Bxc3. More common are both ...c5 (hitting the center now that White's
Q is not defending d4) and ...h6 (currently the most fashionable).} ({Here's
an exciting rapid game from last year between the (currently) #3 and #4
players on the FIDE list:} 6... h6 7. Bh4 c5 8. e3 cxd4 9. exd4 Nc6 10. Rd1 g5
11. Bg3 Ne4 12. Bd3 f5 13. O-O Bxc3 (13... f4 $4 14. cxd5 exd5 15. Nxd5 $18)
14. bxc3 f4 15. Bxe4 dxe4 16. Qxe4 Qf6 (16... Qe7 $5) 17. h4 $1 fxg3 18. fxg3
$13 {For the piece, White has three pawns, a lead in development, and an
exposed Black kingside.} Qf5 19. Qe3 Bd7 (19... gxh4 $2 20. d5 $18) 20. hxg5
Qg6 21. gxh6 Qxg3 22. d5 exd5 $4 23. Rxd5 $1 $18 Bf5 24. Rxf5 $4 (24. Qc5 {Only move}
$18 {the double attack on the Bf5 and threat of Rg5+ forking the K and Q will
cost Black a piece:} Bg4 25. Rg5+ Kh8 26. Rg7 $18 {threatening Qg5.}) 24...
Rxf5 25. Qe6+ Rf7 26. Nh4 Ne5 {Only move} 27. Nf5 $2 (27. Rxf7 Nxf7 28. Nf5 $11) 27...
Qxc3 28. Ne7+ Kh8 29. Ng6+ Nxg6 30. Rxf7 Rg8 $19 31. h7 Rg7 32. Rxb7 Qd4+ 33.
Kh1 Qa1+ $4 (33... Nf8 $1 $19) 34. Kh2 $11 Qe5+ 35. Qxe5 Nxe5 36. Rxg7 Kxg7 37.
Kg3 Nxc4 38. Kf4 Kxh7 39. Ke4 Kg6 40. Kd5 Ne3+ 41. Ke4 {1/2-1/2 (41)
Mamedyarov,S (2799)-Ding,L (2777) Huaian 2017}) 7. e3 Nbd7 8. Bd3 dxc4 9. Bxc4
{If Black's Bb4 was on e7 this would be a relatively common QGD position.} h6
10. Bh4 Qa5 11. O-O e5 $2 (11... c5 12. d5 $1 (12. Ne4 $1) 12... Nxd5 (12...
Bxc3 $2 13. dxe6 $18) 13. Nxd5 exd5 14. Bxd5 $16 {White's Rs come into play
much faster than Black's, not to mention the immediate threat to win the Bb3
with a2-a3.}) 12. Bxf6 $1 Nxf6 (12... gxf6 $2 13. Qg6+ $18 {exploits ...h6.})
13. Nxe5 $18 {White has won a center pawn for free, and is ahead in
development too.} Bd6 14. f4 $1 Qc7 15. Qd3 a5 16. a4 Kh8 (16... Ng4 {hoping
to trade before getting squashed,} 17. Ne4 Bf5 18. Nxg4 Bxg4 19. Nf6+ $1 {
with the e6-pawn missing and ...h6, Black's light squares around the K are too
inviting.} gxf6 20. Qg6+ {wins the pawns with checks and then takes the Bg4.})
17. Rac1 Ng8 18. Nb5 $2 {White has such a big advantage that almost any move
is winning -- including this one -- but this trade reduces the pressure on
Black's position and lessens White's plus.} (18. Ne2 $142 {going for Qb3 to
attack f7.}) (18. Ba2 $142 Qe7 19. Bxf7 (19. Bb1) 19... Qxf7 (19... Rxf7 20.
Ng6+) 20. Nxf7+) (18. Ne4 $142 $1 {is the computer's choice, and (of course)
there are some tricky tactics to see:} Bf5 19. Nxd6 $3 (19. g4 $1 $18) 19...
Bxd3 20. Ndxf7+ Rxf7 21. Nxf7+ Kh7 (21... Qxf7 22. Bxf7 Bxf1 23. Kxf1 $18 {
White's up two pawns.}) 22. Bxd3+ g6 23. f5 $1 $18 {For the Q, White has RBPP
and an initiative.}) 18... cxb5 19. Bxf7 {The discovery on the Q and the
mating combo starting with the fork on g6 leave Black no choice:} Bxe5 {Only move} 20.
Rxc7 Bxc7 21. Bxg8 $1 ({It's tempting to keep the LSB to play for an attack,
but it doesn't work:} 21. Bb3 bxa4 22. Bc2 Bf5 $13) 21... Rxg8 22. Qxb5 Bd8 23.
e4 b6 24. Re1 Ba6 25. Qd7 Bf6 26. e5 Rge8 27. Rd1 (27. d5 $142 Rad8 28. Qa7)
27... Be7 28. Qc6 Rab8 29. d5 $6 (29. Qg6 {followed by f5-f6.}) 29... Bc5+ 30.
Kh1 Rbc8 31. Qg6 Be2 {The players agreed to a draw here, which might be
because of time trouble, or White having too much respect for Black's rating.
Objectively, White's connected passed pawns more than make up for Black's
extra B, and so he could reasonably play on, even against someone rated 200
points higher.} 1/2-1/2
merida
46

..

2018 Almonte Open: Report and Games
Source: Canadian Chess