Feb 162017
 

On February 15, 2017, the Toronto Dragons played the Pagonia Penguins. The teams were evenly matched, with 2 GMs, 1 IM and 1 FM each. Toronto won, 9.5 – 6.5, almost entirely on the strength of IM Nikolay Noritsyn’s perfect 4:0 result.

This week’s Canadian Tactic comes from the round 6 PRO Chess League game between Toronto Dragons’ FM Shiyam Thavandiran and the Patgonia Penguins’ GM Fernando PeraltaTheir game was interesting right out of the opening: a Caro-Kann that reached a new position after 5 moves, followed by a complex middlegame where Black played inventively to grab the initiative and the full point.  

Black has just played …Nd4. What should White do? (very complex).

Hint: this one is complicated. Please, consider the following:

 

Spoiler: Highlight to view

(listed here in alpha-numerical order) 

19.c4
19.cxd4
19.Nd2
19.Nxd4
19.Rh3

 

() – ()
 
 Round:  Result:
[Event "PRO Chess League"]
[Site "Chess.com"]
[Date "2017.02.15"]
[Round "6.1"]
[White "Thavandiran, Shiyam"]
[Black "Peralta, Fernando"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "B12"]
[WhiteElo "2516"]
[BlackElo "2616"]
[Annotator "John Upper"]
[PlyCount "72"]
[EventDate "2017.01.11"]
[EventType "schev (rapid)"]
[EventRounds "7"]
[WhiteTeam "Toronto Dragons"]
[BlackTeam "Patagonia Penguins"]

1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 Bf5 4. h4 a6 $5 {Rare, but it's been played
successfully a couple of times by Vitiugov.} 5. c3 (5. Be3 h5 6. Bd3 Bxd3 7.
Qxd3 e6 8. Nd2 Ne7 9. Ne2 c5 10. c4 Nbc6 11. O-O cxd4 12. Nxd4 Nxe5 13. Qb3
dxc4 14. Nxc4 (14. Qxb7 Qd5 $1 $15) 14... Nxc4 15. Qxc4 Rc8 16. Qe2 Nd5 $15 {
0-1 (40) Sutovsky,E (2647)-Vitiugov,N (2721) Tallinn (rapid), 2016.}) 5... Qc7
{Move 5 and we're in uncharted territory: no games in the MegaBase from here.}
6. g4 Bd7 7. h5 {Stopping ...h5.} (7. Be2 h5 $5) 7... c5 8. Be3 Nc6 9. Nd2 Nh6
10. Be2 f6 $1 {Black's position looks weird, but if he'd played ...e6 it would
be an advance French, where White's kingside expansion would look outrageously
ambitious.} 11. f4 fxe5 (11... Qb6 12. Nb3 (12. Qb3 Qxb3 13. Nxb3 c4 14. Nc5
Bxg4 $15) 12... cxd4 13. cxd4 $13) 12. dxe5 ({It's easy to imagine a weaker
player as White continuing} 12. fxe5 e6 13. Bxh6 {"trading the bad B and
wrecking Black's kingside"} gxh6 14. Ngf3 O-O-O $15 {only to discover that
Black is better! Despite the sensible trades by White, Black's B-pair,
possible play against the White K if White castles long, and lack of squares
for the white Ns leave Black better. One possible continuation, not forced, is:
} 15. Qc2 Kb8 16. O-O-O cxd4 $1 17. cxd4 Qa5 18. Kb1 Nb4 19. Qb3 Ba4 20. Qa3
Bc2+ $19) 12... e6 13. Nb3 b6 14. Qd2 d4 $5 {Black boldly stirs up
complications.} (14... a5 15. a4 (15. O-O-O $6 a4 16. Na1 a3 17. b3 d4 $1 $17)
15... Be7 {or ...000.}) 15. Bf2 dxc3 16. bxc3 Be7 17. O-O-O a5 18. Qe3 $6 (18.
Qc2 {Was better.} {avoiding Black's tactics.}) 18... Nd4 $5 {[#]} 19. Nd2 ({Obviously
not:} 19. cxd4 $4 cxd4+ $19 {capturing with check and winning the Qe3.}) (19.
Rh3 {shows one Black threat:} Nxb3+ 20. axb3 a4 {with strong play against the
white K.}) (19. c4 Bc6 20. Rh2 Nxe2+ 21. Qxe2 O-O $1 {it might look mad to
castle when the white pawns are so far advanced, but there are no hooks, so
White has no way to open lines; e.g.} 22. g5 Nf5 $17 {and if White pushes
either g or h-pawn Black will push past to keep both kingside files closed. On
the other side of the board Black has hooks to open lines, and can continue
with ....Qb7, ...a4 and a well-timed ...b5}) (19. Nxd4 $1 cxd4 20. Qxd4 $5 (20.
Rxd4 {is playable, and probably best} Bc5 21. Qd3 Bxd4 22. Bxd4) 20... Bc5 {
skewering the Bf2} (20... Bc6 21. Rh3 $1 $13 (21. Bf3 $4 Rd8 $1 22. Qe3 Ba3+
$19 {wins a R.})) (20... Rc8 $5 21. Nh3 $1 {Defends the Bf2, but also forces
the Be7 to stay there to defend g5. If} Bc5 $2 {White has a fantastic exchange
sac:} (21... Qxc3+ $14) 22. Qxd7+ $3 Qxd7 23. Rxd7 Kxd7 24. Rd1+ $18 Kc7 (24...
Ke7 25. Bh4+ $18) 25. Bxc5 bxc5 26. Ng5 Rhe8 27. Rd6 $18) 21. Qe4 $5 {
attacking the Ra8} (21. Qc4 {is safest.} Ba3+ 22. Kb1 Qxc4 23. Bxc4 Nxg4 24.
Bd4 $13) 21... Bc6 {defending the Ra8 and skewering the Rh1; Black would be
winning here, except for} 22. Bb5 $1 Ba3+ {Only move.} (22... Rc8 $2 23. Qxc6+ Qxc6 24.
Bxc6+ Rxc6 25. Bxc5 Rxc5 {Black will get a pawn back, but White's development
gives him a plus; e.g.} 26. Rd6 $14) 23. Kb1 {Only move.} (23. Kc2 $2 Bxb5 {Only move.} 24. Qxa8+
Kf7 25. Qxh8 Qc4 {Only move.} $19 {and White is getting mated.}) 23... Bxb5 $3 24. Qxa8+
Kf7 25. Qe4 {Only move.} (25. Qxh8 $2 Qxc3 26. Bd4 Bd3+ {Only move.}) 25... Bc6 26. Qc4 b5 27. Qb3
Bxh1 28. Qxa3 $15 Be4+ 29. Ka1 {Only move.} $15 (29. Kb2 $4 b4 $19)) 19... O-O 20. Bg3
Qc6 21. Rh2 $6 (21. Ne4 Nxe2+ 22. Qxe2 Qa4 {is similar to the game.}) 21...
Nxe2+ 22. Qxe2 Qa4 $19 23. Kb1 (23. c4 Qa3+ $19 {wins the Bg3.}) 23... Bb5 24.
c4 (24. Qf3 Rad8 25. Nb3 Bc6 26. Qe2 Rxd1+ 27. Qxd1 c4 $19) 24... Qb4+ 25. Ka1
Qc3+ 26. Kb1 Ba4 {White is hanging on d1 and g3.} 27. Ne4 Qb4+ 28. Ka1 Bxd1 29.
Qxd1 Qxc4 30. Qc2 Qf1+ 31. Kb2 Qxg1 {Black is up a R, but I suppose noone
wants to resign in a team match.} 32. Rd2 Rad8 33. Rxd8 Rxd8 34. Bf2 Qxg4 35.
Qc4 Kh8 36. f5 exf5 0-1
merida
46

 


Tactics: Penguin eats Dragon
Source: Canadian Chess